Southampton’s first railway station, the original terminal of the London and Southampton Railway, was built on what was then the Saltmarsh and what is now the east side of Terminus Terrace. It was designed by William Tite, and opened in May 1840, making it one of the world's oldest surviving station buildings. It is an imposing three-storey, stuccoed building in a restrained classical style. The ground floor had five arched openings, the central three forming the entrance to the station. The station, which was originally known as Southampton Station, was renamed Southampton Docks in 1858, Southampton Town and Docks in 1896, Southampton Town for Docks in 1912 and Southampton Terminus in 1935. It was closed in September 1966 and has since been used as a casino and restaurant. It is Grade II* listed.

Terminus Station

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Engraved by J Newman, 1840

Terminus Station

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From an engraving published by J & F H R Wood in 1841

Terminus Station

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Photograph, c.2005


Further reading:
Southampton Occasional Notes, by ‘Townsman’, p30. (HS/h)
Buildings of England: Hampshire and the I.O.W., by Nikolaus Pevsner and David Lloyd, p532. (H/i)
Southampton’s Historic Buildings, by R. J. Coles, p29. (HS/k)
Southampton Railways, by Bert Moody. (HS/pk)


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