This newspaper, first published in August 1888, was produced and largely financed by the Cornish Liberal reformer J. Passmore Edwards. Edwards made a fortune in publishing and spent much of it philanthropically on hospitals, orphanages and public libraries. He campaigned against poverty and supported free trade and pacifism; the early editions of the Echo reflected these views. Its main rival in the town was the weekly Hampshire Advertiser. This was originally a Conservative organ but by the 1880s it had adopted a more independent outlook and in 1891 the Daily Echo was purchased by the Hampshire Advertiser Group.

The Daily Echo originally operated from premises at 52 Above Bar Street. These premises were rebuilt on the same site in 1904 and enlarged in the 1920s. They were destroyed during the Blitz and rebuilt in 1956. They were finally demolished in 1999 when the newspaper moved to Redbridge Lane to make way for the West Quay Shopping Centre development.

Southern Daily Echo

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Southern Daily Echo Offices, Above Bar Street. Photograph, c.1890

Southern Daily Echo

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Southern Daily Echo Offices, Above Bar Street. The Echo offices photographed during World War I. The map shows the position of allied troops

Southern Daily Echo

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Southern Daily Echo Offices, Above Bar Street. The new post-war Echo offices, photographed in the 1980s


Further reading:
Echoes of a Century, 1864-1964: The Centenary History of Southern Newspapers Ltd, by Gordon Sewell. (H/y)


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