Buildings, not communities, are here listed.
1) 1799: The first purpose-built Methodist chapel was built on the south corner of Canal Walk and Bell Street in 1799. The chapel was taken over by the Unitarians when the Methodists moved into their new church in East Street in 1850. The Unitarians moved to their newly-built Church of the Saviour in London Road in 1860 and the building was subsequently used as a temperance meeting hall, a school and a free school meals depot. It was probably demolished as part of the slum clearances of the 1930s.
2) 1838: The Primitive Methodists built a chapel in St. Mary Street in 1838. It occupied nos. 134 and 135 on the east side of the street between Bevois Street and James Street. It was subsequently used as an Oddfellows Hall, auction rooms and a parish office.
3) 1850: The new Methodist church in East Street was constructed in 1850 in very ornate Decorated Gothic style. The architect was James Wilson of Bath and the builder was George Brinton of Southampton. It was situated on the north side of East Street between the Strand and Queen's Buildings and set back from the line of shops, between nos. 28 and 29 East Street. Edwin Jones bought the building for use as a staff canteen in 1925. It was destroyed in the Blitz of 1940.
4) 1857: An Independent Wesleyan chapel was established in Broad Street, Kingsland in 1857. It was used until 1883.
5) 1861: Bevois Town Methodist Church was built on the triangle of land between Bevois Valley Road and Peterborough Road. Built in 1861, it was substantially enlarged in 1906. The church was badly damaged during World War Two and remained empty for many years. It was used as a furniture warehouse for a time, before being purchased by the Sikh community in 1971 and converted to a Sikh temple.


see also

Canal Walk Methodist Chapel
East Street Methodist Church
Bevois Town Methodist Chapel


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